Bamboo rehabilitation

Bamboo rehabilitation

am 12.04.2006 12:08:34 von Shalom Atlas

I just moved into a new flat and have volunteered to take over the garden.
There is a small stand of bamboo that is overgrown with english ivy and
hasn't been cared for in years. I am in the process of removing the ivy but
there are old stems and decayed parts about two feet high all around the
fresh growth. If I just remove as much of the decayed growth as possible
will I do any damage to the plant?

Thanks very much.

John in Jerusalem

Re: Bamboo rehabilitation

am 13.04.2006 16:08:36 von HumanJHawkins

Shalom Atlas wrote:
<CUT>
> there are old stems and decayed parts about two feet high all around the
> fresh growth. If I just remove as much of the decayed growth as possible
> will I do any damage to the plant?

Removing the dead parts will not harm a thing, though I am sure some of
them will be difficult to get at around the live growth.

Further, unless the plant is in really bad health you can safely remove
quite a few shorter culms (stems) and lower branches if you think it
will make the plant more beautiful. Bamboo is a grass... A very large
grass, but a grass nonetheless. If you don't go way overboard, this
sort of trimming is no more harmful than mowing your lawn.

I am told the Japanese have a saying that goes something like this: "In
a bamboo grove, you should be able to walk with an open umbrella
between the culms." I am sure this applies more to large Madake or Moso
forests when taken literally, but smaller groves can often benefit from
removal of some culms so that you get a good and elegant view of the
others.

Final note: If you chop up whatever you take out, and put it back in as
mulch, the plant will regain important nutrients from it over time.

Cheers!