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#1: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-11 03:16:25 by Steve Wallis

Hi,

I live in Hobart and want to plant some tree ferns (or Man ferns as they
call them here). What is the best Month to do it? The local nursery stocks
them all year and say anytime is ok, but I want to give them the best chance
of surviving as I am a health hazard to plants.

We also have a well established Daphne in the spot I would like to build a
shed. I believe transplanting these is difficult, even for good gardeners.
Are there any tips which would at least give it a fighting chance, or should
I simply chop it up and compost it?

Finally, regardless of the fate of the existing Daphne, I am trying to find
a variegated one, but have not seen any at the nursery. Nor were they
hopeful of procuring any for me. Any clues where I can find them?

Thanks in advance for any assistance,

Steve

(bigpondnotyahoo)

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#2: Re: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-11 03:42:23 by Jonno

Steve Wallis wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I live in Hobart and want to plant some tree ferns (or Man ferns as they
> call them here). What is the best Month to do it? The local nursery stocks
> them all year and say anytime is ok, but I want to give them the best chance
> of surviving as I am a health hazard to plants.
>
> We also have a well established Daphne in the spot I would like to build a
> shed. I believe transplanting these is difficult, even for good gardeners.
> Are there any tips which would at least give it a fighting chance, or should
> I simply chop it up and compost it?
>
> Finally, regardless of the fate of the existing Daphne, I am trying to find
> a variegated one, but have not seen any at the nursery. Nor were they
> hopeful of procuring any for me. Any clues where I can find them?
>
> Thanks in advance for any assistance,
>
> Steve
>
> (bigpondnotyahoo)
>
>
>
Dapnes are shallow rooted. The best way to move them is the dig
underneath as far as possible, put a hessain bag or similar underneath
and feed them a good liquid fertiliser before hand.
Make sure, they dont dry out, replant as a matter of extreme urgency,
watering the plant in well so roots make intimate contact with soil. I
did, only to have the dapne succumb to a virus 2 years later. Facing the
rising sun is the only spot to put the mand get the best results. This
does not mean full sun at noon....in summertime....
Variegatedtypes >>> Ask your nursery man to get them in. There should be
plenty about in Tassie where I moved from.

Tree ferns are best moved in winter and spring Autumns planting are
probably the best. Make sure they are in a shady spot with lots of
moisture (that should'nt be too hard in Hobart)
Choping it donw is such a waste. Also getting cuttings started is also a
good time right now...There are special jell type propagating starters
around, again, ask your nursery man. If he gives you a blank look,
change him and phone around...

Report this message

#3: Re: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-11 03:54:01 by Jonno

Jonno wrote:
> Steve Wallis wrote:
>
>> Hi,
>>
>> I live in Hobart and want to plant some tree ferns (or Man ferns as
>> they call them here). What is the best Month to do it? The local
>> nursery stocks them all year and say anytime is ok, but I want to give
>> them the best chance of surviving as I am a health hazard to plants.
>>
>> We also have a well established Daphne in the spot I would like to
>> build a shed. I believe transplanting these is difficult, even for
>> good gardeners. Are there any tips which would at least give it a
>> fighting chance, or should I simply chop it up and compost it?
>>
>> Finally, regardless of the fate of the existing Daphne, I am trying to
>> find a variegated one, but have not seen any at the nursery. Nor were
>> they hopeful of procuring any for me. Any clues where I can find them?
>>
>> Thanks in advance for any assistance,
>>
>> Steve
>>
>> (bigpondnotyahoo)
>>
>>
>>
> Dapnes are shallow rooted. The best way to move them is the dig
> underneath as far as possible, put a hessain bag or similar underneath
> and feed them a good liquid fertiliser before hand.
> Make sure, they dont dry out, replant as a matter of extreme urgency,
> watering the plant in well so roots make intimate contact with soil. I
> did, only to have the dapne succumb to a virus 2 years later. Facing the
MUST LEARN TO TYPE >rising sun is the only spot to put them and get the
best results. This
> does not mean full sun at noon....in summertime....
> Variegatedtypes >>> Ask your nursery man to get them in. There should be
> plenty about in Tassie where I moved from.
>
> Tree ferns are best moved in winter and spring Autumns planting are
> probably the best. Make sure they are in a shady spot with lots of
> moisture (that should'nt be too hard in Hobart)
> Choping it donw is such a waste. Also getting cuttings started is also a
> good time right now...There are special jell type propagating starters
> around, again, ask your nursery man. If he gives you a blank look,
> change him and phone around...

Report this message

#4: Re: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-11 04:19:42 by Steve Wallis

Thanks Jonno,

What would be the best month for me to try moving the daphne?

Also I found this a little confusing:

>> Tree ferns are best moved in winter and spring Autumns planting are
>> probably the best.

Do you mean anytime is Ok except Summer?

Regards

Steve

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#5: Re: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-11 12:17:38 by Jonno

Steve Wallis wrote:
> Thanks Jonno,
>
> What would be the best month for me to try moving the daphne?
>
> Also I found this a little confusing:
>
>
>>>Tree ferns are best moved in winter and spring Autumns planting are
>>>probably the best.
>
>
> Do you mean anytime is Ok except Summer?
>
> Regards
>
> Steve
>
>
Any time, especially now but not mid summer. When it looks coolish is
better for any plant to establish it self. A sudden burstsof heat will
kill things.
Everything is growing rather slowly at present.
I would prefer to transplant dapne in Autumn, but I "suppose" it would
be OK now. I succeeded OK in transplanting. That Dapne virusis dangerous
though...
It starts to get an extra spurt of growth in spring, so I'd be sure to
give it plent of liquid aquasol or similar before the move...
and after.

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#6: Re: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-11 14:49:52 by ant

Steve Wallis wrote:

> Finally, regardless of the fate of the existing Daphne, I am trying
> to find a variegated one, but have not seen any at the nursery. Nor
> were they hopeful of procuring any for me. Any clues where I can find
> them?

Find someone who has one, and take a cutting? Great way to grow daphne.
Maybe check out fetes and things in spring, people strike them in butter
containers and flog them! Getting a daphne happy is a great thing. If
they're happy, they'll grow like mad, but if they get annoyed, that's it. I
haven't even thought of trying to grow one up here, windy and dry. No
self-respecting daphne would have a bar of it.
I love daphne, they smell like heavan. Some are like lemons, others are like
strawberry icecream.


--
ant

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#7: Re: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-11 15:17:10 by Jonno

ant wrote:
> Steve Wallis wrote:
>
>
>>Finally, regardless of the fate of the existing Daphne, I am trying
>>to find a variegated one, but have not seen any at the nursery. Nor
>>were they hopeful of procuring any for me. Any clues where I can find
>>them?
>
>
> Find someone who has one, and take a cutting? Great way to grow daphne.
> Maybe check out fetes and things in spring, people strike them in butter
> containers and flog them! Getting a daphne happy is a great thing. If
> they're happy, they'll grow like mad, but if they get annoyed, that's it. I
> haven't even thought of trying to grow one up here, windy and dry. No
> self-respecting daphne would have a bar of it.
> I love daphne, they smell like heavan. Some are like lemons, others are like
> strawberry icecream.
>
>
You do have to make sure you dont get one which has a virus though. Lots
of them grown from cuttings are not sterile and succumb to the damn disease.
Read the other day of grape vines with diseases, which were put through
a heat sterilization process. Think it may be enough to keep these
cuttings in a moist elevated temperature for many hours, but not to kill
them. This will kill the viruses (much the same way as the human body
tries to get rid of them) at somewhere around 108 fahrenheit it wil l
probably take some experimentation...and some technical knowledge.
Could be a fish aquarium with heater set at higher temp.
(Whoops my brains are showing again)
Also grow passion fruit vines from freshly opened fruits...Thats when
they germinate the best. Then stand back!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

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#8: Passionfruit, was Re: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-12 14:01:11 by ant

Jonno wrote:

> Also grow passion fruit vines from freshly opened fruits...Thats when
> they germinate the best. Then stand back!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

How does that work? Never heard of that! I don't know if they are growable
here, but it's interesting.

--
ant

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#9: Re: Passionfruit, was Re: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-12 16:24:49 by Jonno

ant wrote:
> Jonno wrote:
>
>
>>Also grow passion fruit vines from freshly opened fruits...Thats when
>>they germinate the best. Then stand back!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
>
>
> How does that work? Never heard of that! I don't know if they are growable
> here, but it's interesting.
>
Just dry the seeds after removing the pulp. Plant them immediately after
doing so.
Most Nursery Men would have you grow them from a "grafted variety" like
"nelly kelly" A common con. You dont need to buy the grafted veriet
unless you have problems> So far so good....
So no need to get those. Mine grew from a seed some one accidentally
added to a pot.
SO I now have some now grated variety which is near a water drain pipe
from a shed> its bustedbut feeds water to the vine when it rains.
Perfect co operation and a lot of chook poo does the job. The vine is
now some 300 fruits a year or more.
Dont forget you can prune them to suit you, other wise its all over red
rover everything.... Its huge....
Its a black passion fruit. Dont foget these things are a local fruit.
(NATIVE PLANT) to Australia plus a few other pacific islands...
I have about 15 seedlings ready to plant for some lucky people locally...

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#10: Re: Passionfruit, was Re: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-13 12:57:35 by ant

Jonno wrote:
> ant wrote:
>> Jonno wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Also grow passion fruit vines from freshly opened fruits...Thats
>>> when they germinate the best. Then stand back!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
>>
>>
>> How does that work? Never heard of that! I don't know if they are
>> growable here, but it's interesting.
>>
> Just dry the seeds after removing the pulp. Plant them immediately
> after doing so.
> Most Nursery Men would have you grow them from a "grafted variety"
> like "nelly kelly" A common con. You dont need to buy the grafted
> veriet unless you have problems> So far so good....
> So no need to get those. Mine grew from a seed some one accidentally
> added to a pot.
> SO I now have some now grated variety which is near a water drain pipe
> from a shed> its bustedbut feeds water to the vine when it rains.
> Perfect co operation and a lot of chook poo does the job. The vine is
> now some 300 fruits a year or more.
> Dont forget you can prune them to suit you, other wise its all over
> red rover everything.... Its huge....
> Its a black passion fruit. Dont foget these things are a local fruit.
> (NATIVE PLANT) to Australia plus a few other pacific islands...
> I have about 15 seedlings ready to plant for some lucky people
> locally...

Well, I bet they'll hate it here, but maybe under the deck... will give this
a go.

--
ant

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#11: Re: Passionfruit, was Re: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-13 13:39:18 by Jonno

ant wrote:
> Jonno wrote:
>
>>ant wrote:
>>
>>>Jonno wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>Also grow passion fruit vines from freshly opened fruits...Thats
>>>>when they germinate the best. Then stand back!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
>>>
>>>
>>>How does that work? Never heard of that! I don't know if they are
>>>growable here, but it's interesting.
>>>
>>
>>Just dry the seeds after removing the pulp. Plant them immediately
>> after doing so.
>>Most Nursery Men would have you grow them from a "grafted variety"
>>like "nelly kelly" A common con. You dont need to buy the grafted
>>veriet unless you have problems> So far so good....
>>So no need to get those. Mine grew from a seed some one accidentally
>>added to a pot.
>>SO I now have some now grated variety which is near a water drain pipe
>>from a shed> its bustedbut feeds water to the vine when it rains.
>>Perfect co operation and a lot of chook poo does the job. The vine is
>>now some 300 fruits a year or more.
>>Dont forget you can prune them to suit you, other wise its all over
>>red rover everything.... Its huge....
>>Its a black passion fruit. Dont foget these things are a local fruit.
>>(NATIVE PLANT) to Australia plus a few other pacific islands...
>>I have about 15 seedlings ready to plant for some lucky people
>>locally...
>
>
> Well, I bet they'll hate it here, but maybe under the deck... will give this
> a go.
>
Why where are you?

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#12: Re: Passionfruit, was Re: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-14 06:21:26 by John Savage

Jonno &lt;<a href="mailto:Nohelp&#64;nospamnet.org.au" target="_blank">Nohelp&#64;nospamnet.org.au</a>&gt; writes:
&gt;Most Nursery Men would have you grow them from a &quot;grafted variety&quot; like
&gt;&quot;nelly kelly&quot; A common con. You dont need to buy the grafted veriet
&gt;unless you have problems&gt; So far so good....

Perhaps you can explain this:- Nelly Kelly is usually grafted onto a
banana passionfruit rootstock because it's robust and disease-resistant.
But isn't the fruit of the banana passionfruit quite large and tasty,
and the flowers attractive too? So why don't more people grow the
ungrafted banana itself instead of the more expensive grafted species?

&gt;Dont forget you can prune them to suit you, other wise its all over red
&gt;rover everything.... Its huge....

Just as importantly, don't forget to water the vine during winter! I had
a heavy-bearing passion vine but during its dormant period I overlooked
the need to keep its sandy soil moist, and as spring warmed up it died of
thirst. :-( Only after it was gone did I appreciate how good it had been.

&gt;Its a black passion fruit. Dont foget these things are a local fruit.
&gt;(NATIVE PLANT) to Australia plus a few other pacific islands...

Are they really? Alongside the walking trail in some national parks I've
seen a vine that looked similar to the passionfruit but I assumed it to
be an exotic introduced to the park by visitors.
--
John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)

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#13: Re: Passionfruit, was Re: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-14 09:49:44 by Jonno

John Savage wrote:
&gt; Jonno &lt;<a href="mailto:Nohelp&#64;nospamnet.org.au" target="_blank">Nohelp&#64;nospamnet.org.au</a>&gt; writes:
&gt;
&gt;&gt;Most Nursery Men would have you grow them from a &quot;grafted variety&quot; like
&gt;&gt;&quot;nelly kelly&quot; A common con. You dont need to buy the grafted veriet
&gt;&gt;unless you have problems&gt; So far so good....
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; Perhaps you can explain this:- Nelly Kelly is usually grafted onto a
&gt; banana passionfruit rootstock because it's robust and disease-resistant.
&gt; But isn't the fruit of the banana passionfruit quite large and tasty,
&gt; and the flowers attractive too? So why don't more people grow the
&gt; ungrafted banana itself instead of the more expensive grafted species?
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;&gt;Dont forget you can prune them to suit you, other wise its all over red
&gt;&gt;rover everything.... Its huge....
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; Just as importantly, don't forget to water the vine during winter! I had
&gt; a heavy-bearing passion vine but during its dormant period I overlooked
&gt; the need to keep its sandy soil moist, and as spring warmed up it died of
&gt; thirst. :-( Only after it was gone did I appreciate how good it had been.
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;&gt;Its a black passion fruit. Dont foget these things are a local fruit.
&gt;&gt;(NATIVE PLANT) to Australia plus a few other pacific islands...
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; Are they really? Alongside the walking trail in some national parks I've
&gt; seen a vine that looked similar to the passionfruit but I assumed it to
&gt; be an exotic introduced to the park by visitors.
Check here on my travels surfing everywhere
I came accross this info&gt;&gt; <a href="http://www.b-and-t-world-seeds.com/Passion.htm" target="_blank">http://www.b-and-t-world-seeds.com/Passion.htm</a>

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#14: Re: Passionfruit, was Re: Tree Ferns & Daphne

Posted on 2006-07-14 15:11:37 by ant

Jonno wrote:
&gt; Why where are you?

On a mountain overlooking Canberra and the ranges.

--
ant

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