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#1: Orchid Trends

Posted on 2006-07-10 20:06:39 by Susan Erickson

What kind of trends have you noticed in the breeding of your favorite
orchid.

Orchids have 'fashions' or trends just like home decor. For a while
now there has been a big Phal in every home decor photo. A while a go
every new catt hybrid was a splash petal. Then it was the
'window-sill catts'. Now?

I am sure the down size of our favorites is a big one. After all it
increases the available buyers. It is much easier to use 4" pots on a
windowsill than it is to have 8" or larger. The collection can also
be more inclusive or diverse.

I think there is also a push back to species as well as smaller
plants. But I am looking for insight from all over.

What is available in your area and what are you and your orchid
friends looking for?

Thanks for the help.
In case you did not guess -- I need to do a 5 min. synopsis of trends.

SuE
<a href="http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids" target="_blank">http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids</a>

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#2: Re: Orchid Trends

Posted on 2006-07-10 20:38:53 by Rob

Susan Erickson wrote:

&gt; Thanks for the help.
&gt; In case you did not guess -- I need to do a 5 min. synopsis of trends.
&gt;
&gt; SuE
&gt; <a href="http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids" target="_blank">http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids</a>


Ah... Judging homework... So, I'll contribute my own two cents on
slippers, which probably is vastly different than anybody else's (since
I have no clue!), so perhaps we can start an argument. From my own
experience, the trend in phrag breeding (and buying) seems to be in
besseae x long petal types (Ruby Slippers), and is getting away from the
'besseae type' breeding (breeding for bigger and better besseaes, ala
Scarlet O'Hara). But that might be a fickle trend. A lot more interest
in soft pastel colors (from schlimii and fischeri influence). Of course
kovachii hybrids will be big, expect to see them everywhere in the next
couple of years.

I can't figure out paph breeding right now. I love maudiae types, and
that is what I'm buying (and trying to breed, with minimal success).
But they haven't been selling well this year, at least at shows around
me. A shame, since the influence of some of the newest generation of
sukhakulii (huge and wide petaled) is really a quantum leap forward in
this type of breeding. Coloratums are not selling at all, vinicolors
are selling a bit. I could have sold as many albinistic maudiae types
as I had, if I had been willing to part with them, so perhaps those are
becoming popular again. I think multiflorals are pretty much tapped
out, until we get some new species to work with. Complex breeding has
probably reached a pinnacle, there hasn't really been a major
improvement over the Winston Churchill type (big spotted complex) in the
last twenty years. They are still getting awards, but I'm not sure that
means much. Incremental progress at best. White/green complex breeding
seems to be peaking as well. Might see substantial activity in what
were described as 'teacup' complex in a recent Orchids Digest article -
wee little plants with good sized flowers. Based on the number of
people who ask me, there is a general resurgence in the demand for
complex 'bulldog' type paphs, so perhaps even if there isn't a great
improvement over previous years they are becoming more popular. The old
is new again? Like bell-bottom jeans, I guess.

--
Rob's Rules: <a href="http://littlefrogfarm.com" target="_blank">http://littlefrogfarm.com</a>
1) There is always room for one more orchid
2) There is always room for two more orchids
2a) See rule 1
3) When one has insufficient credit to obtain more
orchids, obtain more credit

Report this message

#3: Re: Orchid Trends

Posted on 2006-07-10 20:53:45 by bill

Susan Erickson wrote:
&gt; What kind of trends have you noticed in the breeding of your favorite
&gt; orchid.
&gt;
&gt; Orchids have 'fashions' or trends just like home decor. For a while
&gt; now there has been a big Phal in every home decor photo. A while a go
&gt; every new catt hybrid was a splash petal. Then it was the
&gt; 'window-sill catts'. Now?
&gt;
&gt; I am sure the down size of our favorites is a big one. After all it
&gt; increases the available buyers. It is much easier to use 4&quot; pots on a
&gt; windowsill than it is to have 8&quot; or larger. The collection can also
&gt; be more inclusive or diverse.
&gt;
&gt; I think there is also a push back to species as well as smaller
&gt; plants. But I am looking for insight from all over.
&gt;
&gt; What is available in your area and what are you and your orchid
&gt; friends looking for?
&gt;
&gt; Thanks for the help.
&gt; In case you did not guess -- I need to do a 5 min. synopsis of trends.
&gt;
&gt; SuE
&gt; <a href="http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids" target="_blank">http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids</a>


Very definately Oncidiinae Intergenerics!!!!! From the tiny flowered
Onc. ornithorynchum hybrids to the Odontocidiums &amp; don't forget
Miltonias &amp; their hybrids. They are really hot!!! Rainbow colors
multi-flowering and managable sizes. Good luck with them they are so
easy a cave man could grow them--- OOOOPS, I didn't know you guys were
still around. Good growing, Bill

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#4: Re: Orchid Trends

Posted on 2006-07-10 21:51:20 by Diana Kulaga

This could be an interesting thread. What I can offer to the conversation is
purely anecdotal, but here goes.

First, Sue is absolutely correct about the trend in advertising. Phals are
everywhere, from the NY Times sunday magazine to local furniture ads in the
paper. Every foodie mag worth its salt seems to have them in their ads, too.

Second, many of the folks I know are looking for species (not exclusively,
of course), which is one reason why Redland is so popular. Also, people seem
to be moving away from novelty Catts and toward heirloom plants.

And I am constantly amazed by the numbers of people who are growing orchids.
It seems as though almost everyone has at least a few. Because we are in FL,
that may be due to the ease of growing them, and to the ubiquitousness of
the plants. They show up everywhere from flea markets to farmers' markets to
supermarkets to HD. We were at my son's house for brunch recently, and were
surprised to learn that the most unlikely people (other guests) had &quot;20 or
30&quot; orchids.

A friend of many years, who was the owner of a retail floral business, is
now down here in FL and I was surprised to learn that while he knows a lot
about Phals &amp; Dends, didn't know a thing about growing Catts. You can be
sure that I cured that little problem in short order, and he is now hooked
on fragrant Catts. His collection has grown so quickly that he built a shade
house this year, complete with watering system. Aah, another notch on my
belt, LOL!

Diana

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#5: Re: Orchid Trends

Posted on 2006-07-10 22:48:08 by K Barrett

Dear God in Heaven!! 5 MINUTES on trends??? Are they insane?

OK how about

&quot;After everyone agreed that it was impossible to improve on white
Phalaenopsis breeding along came equestris leading to multiflora breeding,
Golden Peoker's genetic malfunctions and harlequin breeding, and line
breeding with violacea and X* for blue and red phalaenopsis.&quot; (*You'll have
to research this SuE, I can't recall what the major parent species is for
reds... I know teh latest IPA mag went into lines, but I'm just blanking)

That should take you up through the 1st 30 seconds...

&quot;The trend away from large Euanthe hybrids and in to species Vanda
hybridization is exemplified by Martin Motes and Bob Fuchs production of
line bred purple tessellata and its hybrids, and Motes has lead in
hybridizing with Vanda species, as opposed to Euanthe line breeding. (See
Motes year long series of articles in 'Orchids' - I believe 2004.)

That's the next 30 seconds....

&quot;Alan Koch has used Orpetii, sincorana, luteola and most recently alaorii to
not only reduce the size of cattleya breeding but increase the number of
times a cattleya can flower in a year - according to the July 'Orchids'
magazine all of these traits lead to Cattleya production that (hopefully)
can rival phalaenopsis in orchid sales.&quot; (You'll probably have to research
Broughtonia breeding lines in order to mention that line of breeding. I
know Hamlyn Orchids has been getting quite a few awards for their crosses.
I believe broughtonia adds frequent flowering as well as size, stem length
and the ability to grow on a windsowsill. Maybe you can email Hamlyn
Orchids and ask what their views on the subject are. They'll probably
answer you) Anyway, the trend is away from large catts used in flower
arrangements and corsages to smaller plants that bloom more than once in a
year. Also the trend is to use parent species that aren't necessarily
controlled by light, often frustrating for the home grower. This month's
'Orchids' goes over this in the article on spotted orchids, (I think)

Paphs... just say the new breeding lines are illegal to own in this country
and so you can't discuss them.

Lump everything else into &quot;Botanicals for Hobbyists&quot; even though they
aren't. Discuss Fred Clarke's production of his black catasetums (actually
mormodes, but look at the last few years of AQs and you'll see them.. I
think they are on the covers of FisherBishops, too), some of the interesting
bulbo crosses, and Masdevalias that might just make it in the home (Look
into hybrids with abacayana (I spelled that wrong) but it should take you to
things like Cinnamon Twist with a large flower, a tall spike, warmth
tolerance.

OK, that's off the top of my head.

I hope they realy don't mean trends in ALL orchid production....

K Barrett




&quot;Susan Erickson&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:sue&#64;evilsoft.org" target="_blank">sue&#64;evilsoft.org</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:fl45b2dvnl110cjj9e39ru161u2u2ggsqc&#64;4ax.com..." target="_blank">fl45b2dvnl110cjj9e39ru161u2u2ggsqc&#64;4ax.com...</a>
&gt; What kind of trends have you noticed in the breeding of your favorite
&gt; orchid.
&gt;
&gt; Orchids have 'fashions' or trends just like home decor. For a while
&gt; now there has been a big Phal in every home decor photo. A while a go
&gt; every new catt hybrid was a splash petal. Then it was the
&gt; 'window-sill catts'. Now?
&gt;
&gt; I am sure the down size of our favorites is a big one. After all it
&gt; increases the available buyers. It is much easier to use 4&quot; pots on a
&gt; windowsill than it is to have 8&quot; or larger. The collection can also
&gt; be more inclusive or diverse.
&gt;
&gt; I think there is also a push back to species as well as smaller
&gt; plants. But I am looking for insight from all over.
&gt;
&gt; What is available in your area and what are you and your orchid
&gt; friends looking for?
&gt;
&gt; Thanks for the help.
&gt; In case you did not guess -- I need to do a 5 min. synopsis of trends.
&gt;
&gt; SuE
&gt; <a href="http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids" target="_blank">http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids</a>

Report this message

#6: Re: Orchid Trends

Posted on 2006-07-10 22:55:57 by K Barrett

&quot;Rob&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:rob&#64;littlefrogfarm.com" target="_blank">rob&#64;littlefrogfarm.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:e8u6rt$a0l$<a href="mailto:1&#64;news.msu.edu..." target="_blank">1&#64;news.msu.edu...</a>
&gt; Susan Erickson wrote:
&gt;
&gt;&gt; Thanks for the help.
&gt;&gt; In case you did not guess -- I need to do a 5 min. synopsis of trends.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; SuE
&gt;&gt; <a href="http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids" target="_blank">http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids</a>
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; Ah... Judging homework... So, I'll contribute my own two cents on
&gt; slippers, which probably is vastly different than anybody else's (since I
&gt; have no clue!), so perhaps we can start an argument. From my own
&gt; experience, the trend in phrag breeding (and buying) seems to be in
&gt; besseae x long petal types (Ruby Slippers), and is getting away from the
&gt; 'besseae type' breeding (breeding for bigger and better besseaes, ala
&gt; Scarlet O'Hara). But that might be a fickle trend. A lot more interest
&gt; in soft pastel colors (from schlimii and fischeri influence). Of course
&gt; kovachii hybrids will be big, expect to see them everywhere in the next
&gt; couple of years.
&gt;
&gt; I can't figure out paph breeding right now. I love maudiae types, and
&gt; that is what I'm buying (and trying to breed, with minimal success). But
&gt; they haven't been selling well this year, at least at shows around me. A
&gt; shame, since the influence of some of the newest generation of sukhakulii
&gt; (huge and wide petaled) is really a quantum leap forward in this type of
&gt; breeding. Coloratums are not selling at all, vinicolors are selling a
&gt; bit. I could have sold as many albinistic maudiae types as I had, if I
&gt; had been willing to part with them, so perhaps those are becoming popular
&gt; again. I think multiflorals are pretty much tapped out, until we get some
&gt; new species to work with. Complex breeding has probably reached a
&gt; pinnacle, there hasn't really been a major improvement over the Winston
&gt; Churchill type (big spotted complex) in the last twenty years. They are
&gt; still getting awards, but I'm not sure that means much. Incremental
&gt; progress at best. White/green complex breeding seems to be peaking as
&gt; well. Might see substantial activity in what were described as 'teacup'
&gt; complex in a recent Orchids Digest article - wee little plants with good
&gt; sized flowers. Based on the number of people who ask me, there is a
&gt; general resurgence in the demand for complex 'bulldog' type paphs, so
&gt; perhaps even if there isn't a great improvement over previous years they
&gt; are becoming more popular. The old is new again? Like bell-bottom jeans,
&gt; I guess.
&gt;
&gt; --

I agree on the tea cup Paphs (as mentioned in the OD article). They were
also presented at the Paph Guild 2 years ago (or the last time I went) I
believe Helen Congelton can talk about this.... I have no idea if she's on
email.

But Rob, I believe the trend (apart from the illegals and kovachii) is to
use fairrieanum. I've seen quite a few of these in people's talks. Here's
a recent award that shows what I mean - you'd never guess there was
farrieanum in the back ground. I believe farrieanum darkens colors
<a href="http://www.aospacificcentral.org/Sacto2006/paphhirxvir.html" target="_blank">http://www.aospacificcentral.org/Sacto2006/paphhirxvir.html</a>

K Barrett

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#7: Re: Orchid Trends

Posted on 2006-07-10 23:11:20 by jankey

Diana Kulaga wrote:

&gt;
&gt; First, Sue is absolutely correct about the trend in advertising. Phals are
&gt; everywhere, from the NY Times sunday magazine to local furniture ads in the
&gt; paper. Every foodie mag worth its salt seems to have them in their ads, too.


word. and on tv shows: they're always in people's offices and houses;
sean always has a white phal on the credenza in his office in The 4400;
in one episode of Numb3rs, the damsel in distress is chased into her
bathroom by the Evil Stalker, and all i could think was &quot;wow, nice
phals.&quot; (big tall white and purple, at least a half dozen plants.)

and orchids in office bldgs; we're currently hosting about 4 big tall
white dtps' in communal pots on each reception desk where I work. one
of my doctors has them on the reception desk, and the out of bloom ones
get stashed around the exam rooms and restrooms. :) we started doing
this about 5 yrs ago; i don't seem to remember seeing orchids in such
mundane places before that.

--j_a

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#8: Re: Orchid Trends

Posted on 2006-07-10 23:23:09 by Rob

&gt; But Rob, I believe the trend (apart from the illegals and kovachii) is to
&gt; use fairrieanum. I've seen quite a few of these in people's talks. Here's
&gt; a recent award that shows what I mean - you'd never guess there was
&gt; farrieanum in the back ground. I believe farrieanum darkens colors
&gt; <a href="http://www.aospacificcentral.org/Sacto2006/paphhirxvir.html" target="_blank">http://www.aospacificcentral.org/Sacto2006/paphhirxvir.html</a>
&gt;
&gt;

I thought about mentioning fairrieanum... But I didn't realize it was a
trend yet. I've seen some very nice things made with fairrieanum
recently. Fairrieanum x complex can be a stunning combination. X
Winston Churchill gives you P. Oto, which is quite nice. And another
one I have and am not getting rid of is Irish Moss (with Jolly Green
Gem). And crosses with brachys are super sweet. Too bad I can't grow
fairrieanum itself (I can get them from seed to bloom, but they die
right afterwards...).

Nice call, though. I'm going to have to find more fairrieanum hybrids
now that I realize why I like them.
--
Rob's Rules: <a href="http://littlefrogfarm.com" target="_blank">http://littlefrogfarm.com</a>
1) There is always room for one more orchid
2) There is always room for two more orchids
2a) See rule 1
3) When one has insufficient credit to obtain more
orchids, obtain more credit

Report this message

#9: Re: Orchid Trends

Posted on 2006-07-10 23:40:31 by jtill

K Barrett wrote:
&gt; Dear God in Heaven!! 5 MINUTES on trends??? Are they insane?
&gt;
&gt; OK how about
&gt;
&gt; &quot;After everyone agreed that it was impossible to improve on white
&gt; Phalaenopsis breeding along came equestris leading to multiflora breeding,
&gt; Golden Peoker's genetic malfunctions and harlequin breeding, and line
&gt; breeding with violacea and X* for blue and red phalaenopsis.&quot; (*You'll have
&gt; to research this SuE, I can't recall what the major parent species is for
&gt; reds... I know teh latest IPA mag went into lines, but I'm just blanking)
&gt;
&gt; That should take you up through the 1st 30 seconds...
&gt;
&gt; &quot;The trend away from large Euanthe hybrids and in to species Vanda
&gt; hybridization is exemplified by Martin Motes and Bob Fuchs production of
&gt; line bred purple tessellata and its hybrids, and Motes has lead in
&gt; hybridizing with Vanda species, as opposed to Euanthe line breeding. (See
&gt; Motes year long series of articles in 'Orchids' - I believe 2004.)
&gt;
&gt; That's the next 30 seconds....
&gt;
&gt; &quot;Alan Koch has used Orpetii, sincorana, luteola and most recently alaorii to
&gt; not only reduce the size of cattleya breeding but increase the number of
&gt; times a cattleya can flower in a year - according to the July 'Orchids'
&gt; magazine all of these traits lead to Cattleya production that (hopefully)
&gt; can rival phalaenopsis in orchid sales.&quot; (You'll probably have to research
&gt; Broughtonia breeding lines in order to mention that line of breeding. I
&gt; know Hamlyn Orchids has been getting quite a few awards for their crosses.
&gt; I believe broughtonia adds frequent flowering as well as size, stem length
&gt; and the ability to grow on a windsowsill. Maybe you can email Hamlyn
&gt; Orchids and ask what their views on the subject are. They'll probably
&gt; answer you) Anyway, the trend is away from large catts used in flower
&gt; arrangements and corsages to smaller plants that bloom more than once in a
&gt; year. Also the trend is to use parent species that aren't necessarily
&gt; controlled by light, often frustrating for the home grower. This month's
&gt; 'Orchids' goes over this in the article on spotted orchids, (I think)
&gt;
&gt; Paphs... just say the new breeding lines are illegal to own in this country
&gt; and so you can't discuss them.
&gt;
&gt; Lump everything else into &quot;Botanicals for Hobbyists&quot; even though they
&gt; aren't. Discuss Fred Clarke's production of his black catasetums (actually
&gt; mormodes, but look at the last few years of AQs and you'll see them.. I
&gt; think they are on the covers of FisherBishops, too), some of the interesting
&gt; bulbo crosses, and Masdevalias that might just make it in the home (Look
&gt; into hybrids with abacayana (I spelled that wrong) but it should take you to
&gt; things like Cinnamon Twist with a large flower, a tall spike, warmth
&gt; tolerance.
&gt;
&gt; OK, that's off the top of my head.
&gt;
&gt; I hope they realy don't mean trends in ALL orchid production....
&gt;
&gt; K Barrett
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; &quot;Susan Erickson&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:sue&#64;evilsoft.org" target="_blank">sue&#64;evilsoft.org</a>&gt; wrote in message
&gt; news:<a href="mailto:fl45b2dvnl110cjj9e39ru161u2u2ggsqc&#64;4ax.com..." target="_blank">fl45b2dvnl110cjj9e39ru161u2u2ggsqc&#64;4ax.com...</a>
&gt; &gt; What kind of trends have you noticed in the breeding of your favorite
&gt; &gt; orchid.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; Orchids have 'fashions' or trends just like home decor. For a while
&gt; &gt; now there has been a big Phal in every home decor photo. A while a go
&gt; &gt; every new catt hybrid was a splash petal. Then it was the
&gt; &gt; 'window-sill catts'. Now?
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; I am sure the down size of our favorites is a big one. After all it
&gt; &gt; increases the available buyers. It is much easier to use 4&quot; pots on a
&gt; &gt; windowsill than it is to have 8&quot; or larger. The collection can also
&gt; &gt; be more inclusive or diverse.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; I think there is also a push back to species as well as smaller
&gt; &gt; plants. But I am looking for insight from all over.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; What is available in your area and what are you and your orchid
&gt; &gt; friends looking for?
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; Thanks for the help.
&gt; &gt; In case you did not guess -- I need to do a 5 min. synopsis of trends.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; SuE
&gt; &gt; <a href="http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids" target="_blank">http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids</a>

Google
updated pages with mention in last year
Phals 1.4 million
Onc. .5 m
Catt 1.16 m
Paph .5 m
Orchid 28 m

With name in title last 3 mo. last 6 mo.
Phals 66 thousand 63 thou.
Onc. 24 25
Catt 47 46
Paph 30 32
Orchid 1.8 mil

Folk are talking, selling, buying and generally posting about Phals
three times as often as Oncies.

Joe T

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#10: Re: Orchid Trends

Posted on 2006-07-11 00:06:24 by Diana Kulaga

&gt; word. and on tv shows: they're always in people's offices and houses;&lt;

Nero Wolf rides again......

&gt; and orchids in office bldgs; we're currently hosting about 4 big tall
&gt; white dtps' in communal pots on each reception desk where I work.&lt;

The salon where I have my nails done has fake Phals in several places. While
I am glad they like Phals, I detest fake plants of any stripe. I offered to
give them a real one, but it seems that they can't even grow a fern, so fake
it is. Having said that, a big majority of the women who patronize that
salon at the same time as I are orchid growers. Amazin'........

Diana

Report this message

#11: Re: Orchid Trends

Posted on 2006-07-11 07:06:11 by Susan Erickson

On Mon, 10 Jul 2006 17:23:09 -0400, Rob &lt;<a href="mailto:rob&#64;littlefrogfarm.com" target="_blank">rob&#64;littlefrogfarm.com</a>&gt;
wrote:

&gt;
&gt;&gt; But Rob, I believe the trend (apart from the illegals and kovachii) is to
&gt;&gt; use fairrieanum. I've seen quite a few of these in people's talks. Here's
&gt;&gt; a recent award that shows what I mean - you'd never guess there was
&gt;&gt; farrieanum in the back ground. I believe farrieanum darkens colors
&gt;&gt; <a href="http://www.aospacificcentral.org/Sacto2006/paphhirxvir.html" target="_blank">http://www.aospacificcentral.org/Sacto2006/paphhirxvir.html</a>
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt;
&gt;
&gt;I thought about mentioning fairrieanum... But I didn't realize it was a
&gt;trend yet. I've seen some very nice things made with fairrieanum
&gt;recently. Fairrieanum x complex can be a stunning combination. X
&gt;Winston Churchill gives you P. Oto, which is quite nice. And another
&gt;one I have and am not getting rid of is Irish Moss (with Jolly Green
&gt;Gem). And crosses with brachys are super sweet. Too bad I can't grow
&gt;fairrieanum itself (I can get them from seed to bloom, but they die
&gt;right afterwards...).
&gt;
&gt;Nice call, though. I'm going to have to find more fairrieanum hybrids
&gt;now that I realize why I like them.

Paph Angela which is farrieanum x niveum, is a lovely farrieanum shape
but larger and less marked.
SuE
<a href="http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids" target="_blank">http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids</a>

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#12: Re: Orchid Trends

Posted on 2006-07-11 07:18:18 by wendy7

Sue, there is also the trend of hobbyists stating that they have
a certain orchid from a certain well known person's collection.
For instance, I have a plant from the Raymond Burr collection &amp; I am
sure there must have been some crosses made from his plants.
I have plants from Irene Dobkins collection, Jane Clayton, Dr. Bob Hull of
Sunswept Labs, Henri Campagnion &amp; Paul Brechts etc.

--
Cheers Wendy

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Susan Erickson &lt;<a href="mailto:sue&#64;evilsoft.org" target="_blank">sue&#64;evilsoft.org</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt; What kind of trends have you noticed in the breeding of your favorite
&gt; orchid.
&gt;
&gt; Orchids have 'fashions' or trends just like home decor. For a while
&gt; now there has been a big Phal in every home decor photo. A while a go
&gt; every new catt hybrid was a splash petal. Then it was the
&gt; 'window-sill catts'. Now?
&gt;
&gt; I am sure the down size of our favorites is a big one. After all it
&gt; increases the available buyers. It is much easier to use 4&quot; pots on a
&gt; windowsill than it is to have 8&quot; or larger. The collection can also
&gt; be more inclusive or diverse.
&gt;
&gt; I think there is also a push back to species as well as smaller
&gt; plants. But I am looking for insight from all over.
&gt;
&gt; What is available in your area and what are you and your orchid
&gt; friends looking for?
&gt;
&gt; Thanks for the help.
&gt; In case you did not guess -- I need to do a 5 min. synopsis of trends.
&gt;
&gt; SuE
&gt; <a href="http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids" target="_blank">http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/orchids</a>

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