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#1: Re: Toxoplasmosis - US

Posted on 2006-07-20 11:34:53 by Ice

On Thu, 20 Jul 2006 10:03:47 +0100, "Pat Gardiner"
&lt;<a href="mailto:patgardiner&#64;btinternet.com" target="_blank">patgardiner&#64;btinternet.com</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt;Pat's Note: Just to remind you, this is the pig health problem that the
&gt;French Food Standards Agency say is being covered up and underplayed in the
&gt;UK.
&gt;
&gt;Interesting to see how seriously the Americans take it - and that they think
&gt;they are pretty clear of it in the US.
&gt;
&gt;I notice that everyone here are keeping their heads down about the French
&gt;allegation. Presumably that means that, as usual, there is substance to the
&gt;charge.
&gt;
&gt;<a href="http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/carroll/bal-md.ca.pigs20jul20,0,3850771.story?coll=bal-local-carroll" target="_blank"> http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/carroll/bal-md.ca.pig s20jul20,0,3850771.story?coll=bal-local-carroll</a>
&gt;
&gt;12 pigs euthanized after positive parasite tests Owner of quarantined
&gt;Carroll farm says animals are not his
&gt;BY LAURA MCCANDLISH
&gt;SUN REPORTER
&gt;ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED JULY 20, 2006
&gt;
&gt;Twelve pigs believed to have wandered from a quarantined Carroll County farm
&gt;have tested positive for one or two parasites that are contracted by eating
&gt;raw, diseased meat, officials from the Maryland Department of Agriculture
&gt;said yesterday.
&gt;
&gt;All 12 pigs were euthanized and at least three others found on a neighboring
&gt;property should be put down, said Sue duPont, a state agriculture
&gt;spokeswoman.
&gt;The farm's owner maintains that the pigs are feral and not his.
&gt;
&gt;&quot;We don't want any chance of anything going into the human food chain if
&gt;they were sold,&quot; duPont said.
&gt;
&gt;Five of the pigs trapped outside the farm in Marston in western Carroll
&gt;County tested positive for trichinosis, a deadly disease caused by a
&gt;parasitic worm. Trichinosis has all but been eradicated from the nation's
&gt;food supply, agriculture experts said.
&gt;
&gt;Nine of the pigs had toxoplasmosis, a more common parasite sometimes
&gt;contracted from ingested cat feces, according to the national Centers for
&gt;Disease Control and Prevention.
&gt;
&gt;An additional pig that was confiscated from the Marston farm tested negative
&gt;for both trichinosis and toxoplasmosis, duPont said.
&gt;
&gt;State veterinarians will test the remaining pigs that are kept on the
&gt;112-acre farm, owned by Carroll Schisler Sr., 60, of the 2500 block of
&gt;Marston Road and supervised by his son, Carroll Schisler Jr., 34.
&gt;Through their attorneys, both men have maintained that the animals did not
&gt;contract the diseases while in their care.
&gt;
&gt;The two have been arrested on a 19-count indictment that included charges of
&gt;animal cruelty, feeding garbage to swine and selling contaminated meat.
&gt;
&gt;They also face federal charges of operating a slaughterhouse without a
&gt;license from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
&gt;
&gt;Humans can contract trichinosis and toxoplasmosis from eating undercooked,
&gt;contaminated meat, according to the CDC.
&gt;
&gt;However, agriculture officials have said customers probably haven't
&gt;purchased or consumed pork from the Schisler farm since it was quarantined
&gt;in early April.
&gt;
&gt;Regards
&gt;Pat Gardiner
&gt;www.go-self-sufficient.com
&gt;



&quot;As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!&quot;
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
..........among his own relations...
............and in his own house

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#2: Re: Toxoplasmosis - US

Posted on 2006-07-20 14:34:06 by Robert Fuchs

&quot;Ice&quot; babbled on about a couple of meat related parasite problems which
aren't a problem if you cook the meat thoroughly and even then
Toxoplasmosis* isn't that much of a problem seeing as 90% of the French
population are infected by age 40. A result of the national passion for
eating undercooked meat.
It is known to change the habits of infected animals and some say it is
probably responsible for the French national character! :-)

* Only problem is if a Pregnant woman catches it for the first time whilst
pregnant it can seriously damage the baby, if she has already had it for a
while then there usually isn't a problem as her immune system is dealing
with it. In France they give pregnant women tests for it.

--
Regards
Bob Hobden

Report this message

#3: Re: Toxoplasmosis - US

Posted on 2006-07-20 15:15:11 by Pat Gardiner

&quot;Bob Hobden&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:me&#64;privacy.net" target="_blank">me&#64;privacy.net</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:4i9bhnF2m4tgU1&#64;individual.net..." target="_blank">4i9bhnF2m4tgU1&#64;individual.net...</a>
&gt;
&gt; &quot;Ice&quot; babbled on about a couple of meat related parasite problems which
&gt; aren't a problem if you cook the meat thoroughly and even then
&gt; Toxoplasmosis* isn't that much of a problem seeing as 90% of the French
&gt; population are infected by age 40. A result of the national passion for
&gt; eating undercooked meat.
&gt; It is known to change the habits of infected animals and some say it is
&gt; probably responsible for the French national character! :-)
&gt;
&gt; * Only problem is if a Pregnant woman catches it for the first time whilst
&gt; pregnant it can seriously damage the baby, if she has already had it for a
&gt; while then there usually isn't a problem as her immune system is dealing
&gt; with it. In France they give pregnant women tests for it.

You are right as far as it goes.

But during the BBQ season, and in restaurants at all times of year, meat is
often undercooked.

There have been allegations that the dangers of under cooking meat
especially pork have been under emphasised in Britain and indeed that under
cooking actively encouraged. That has been denied, but the main allegation
ignored.

If senior French scientific officials are right and Britain has been
covering up Toxoplasmosis, it is a matter of great concern.

I think the French are right, not least because of the absence of any
response by the Food Standards Agency and/or State Veterinary Service.

Whether the French do or do not have toxoplasmosis is a matter for the
French and for anyone holidaying there?

If we are worried we can all go to Margate. If Margate pork is as bad or
worse, we should be told.

I believe the trendy term is &quot;transparency&quot;, once &quot;open government&quot; and
before that &quot;honesty.&quot;

But that was, alas, long ago.


--
Regards
Pat Gardiner
www.go-self-sufficient.com
&gt;
&gt; --
&gt; Regards
&gt; Bob Hobden
&gt;
&gt;

Report this message

#4: Re: Toxoplasmosis - US

Posted on 2006-07-21 00:25:15 by Robert Fuchs

&quot;Pat Gardiner&quot; wrote after
&gt;
&gt; &quot;Bob Hobden&quot; wrote
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; &quot;Ice&quot; babbled on about a couple of meat related parasite problems which
&gt;&gt; aren't a problem if you cook the meat thoroughly and even then
&gt;&gt; Toxoplasmosis* isn't that much of a problem seeing as 90% of the French
&gt;&gt; population are infected by age 40. A result of the national passion for
&gt;&gt; eating undercooked meat.
&gt;&gt; It is known to change the habits of infected animals and some say it is
&gt;&gt; probably responsible for the French national character! :-)
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; * Only problem is if a Pregnant woman catches it for the first time
&gt;&gt; whilst pregnant it can seriously damage the baby, if she has already had
&gt;&gt; it for a while then there usually isn't a problem as her immune system is
&gt;&gt; dealing with it. In France they give pregnant women tests for it.
&gt;
&gt; You are right as far as it goes.
&gt;
&gt; But during the BBQ season, and in restaurants at all times of year, meat
&gt; is often undercooked.
&gt;
&gt; There have been allegations that the dangers of under cooking meat
&gt; especially pork have been under emphasised in Britain and indeed that
&gt; under cooking actively encouraged. That has been denied, but the main
&gt; allegation ignored.
&gt;
&gt; If senior French scientific officials are right and Britain has been
&gt; covering up Toxoplasmosis, it is a matter of great concern.
&gt;
&gt; I think the French are right, not least because of the absence of any
&gt; response by the Food Standards Agency and/or State Veterinary Service.
&gt;
&gt; Whether the French do or do not have toxoplasmosis is a matter for the
&gt; French and for anyone holidaying there?
&gt;
&gt; If we are worried we can all go to Margate. If Margate pork is as bad or
&gt; worse, we should be told.
&gt;
&gt; I believe the trendy term is &quot;transparency&quot;, once &quot;open government&quot; and
&gt; before that &quot;honesty.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; But that was, alas, long ago.
&gt;
Few Uk people eat virtually raw meat like the French, so provided they
insist it's cooked as much on holiday as they like it cooked at home there
isn't a risk at all.
It's also not just Pork, any animal could carry Toxoplasmosis if they eat
grass contaminated by infected cat faeces. Still can't understand how a
whole herd could get infected, unless the feed is infected. But I thought
there were very strict rules on how any feed is processed these days after
BSE and Foot and Mouth.
--
Regards
Bob Hobden
17mls W. of London.UK

Report this message

#5: Re: Toxoplasmosis - US

Posted on 2006-07-21 08:28:11 by Jim Webster

&quot;Bob Hobden&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:me&#64;privacy.net" target="_blank">me&#64;privacy.net</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:4iae63F2va0pU1&#64;individual.net..." target="_blank">4iae63F2va0pU1&#64;individual.net...</a>

&gt; It's also not just Pork, any animal could carry Toxoplasmosis if they eat
&gt; grass contaminated by infected cat faeces. Still can't understand how a
&gt; whole herd could get infected, unless the feed is infected. But I thought
&gt; there were very strict rules on how any feed is processed these days after
&gt; BSE and Foot and Mouth.
&gt; --

EU rules are very strict on inclusion and treatment. UK actually has a
better record on animal feedstuffs than Germany and the Low Countries
At least we don't have the dioxin problems they have had

--
--

Jim Webster.

Pat Gardiner, now in the sixth year of raving about bent vets and still no
result

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#6: Re: Toxoplasmosis - US

Posted on 2006-07-21 08:58:52 by Tim Lamb

In message &lt;<a href="mailto:4ibag3F3113oU1&#64;individual.net" target="_blank">4ibag3F3113oU1&#64;individual.net</a>&gt;, Jim Webster
&lt;<a href="mailto:Jim&#64;websterpagespabank.freeserve.co.uk" target="_blank">Jim&#64;websterpagespabank.freeserve.co.uk</a>&gt; writes
&gt;
&gt;&quot;Bob Hobden&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:me&#64;privacy.net" target="_blank">me&#64;privacy.net</a>&gt; wrote in message
&gt;news:<a href="mailto:4iae63F2va0pU1&#64;individual.net..." target="_blank">4iae63F2va0pU1&#64;individual.net...</a>
&gt;
&gt;&gt; It's also not just Pork, any animal could carry Toxoplasmosis if they eat
&gt;&gt; grass contaminated by infected cat faeces. Still can't understand how a
&gt;&gt; whole herd could get infected, unless the feed is infected. But I thought
&gt;&gt; there were very strict rules on how any feed is processed these days after
&gt;&gt; BSE and Foot and Mouth.
&gt;&gt; --
&gt;
&gt;EU rules are very strict on inclusion and treatment. UK actually has a
&gt;better record on animal feedstuffs than Germany and the Low Countries
&gt;At least we don't have the dioxin problems they have had

Yes. It is not so long since grain stored for *on farm* feed manufacture
could be accessed by cats. How many small farmers were going to destroy
a batch of feed just because some dried cat turd was found during the
processing?

Various health scares, salmonella etc. in the run up to BSE have led to
a fairly stringent set of rules for feed hygiene on farms in the UK.
Whether this extends to other EU members is beyond my knowledge.

regards
&gt;
&gt;--
&gt; --
&gt;
&gt;Jim Webster.
&gt;
&gt; Pat Gardiner, now in the sixth year of raving about bent vets and still no
&gt;result
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;

--
Tim Lamb

Report this message

#7: Re: Toxoplasmosis - US

Posted on 2006-07-21 09:16:47 by Jim Webster

&quot;Tim Lamb&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:tim&#64;marford.demon.co.uk" target="_blank">tim&#64;marford.demon.co.uk</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:PbZjbNCssHwEFwaF&#64;marford.demon.co.uk..." target="_blank">PbZjbNCssHwEFwaF&#64;marford.demon.co.uk...</a>
&gt; In message &lt;<a href="mailto:4ibag3F3113oU1&#64;individual.net" target="_blank">4ibag3F3113oU1&#64;individual.net</a>&gt;, Jim Webster
&gt; &lt;<a href="mailto:Jim&#64;websterpagespabank.freeserve.co.uk" target="_blank">Jim&#64;websterpagespabank.freeserve.co.uk</a>&gt; writes
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;&quot;Bob Hobden&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:me&#64;privacy.net" target="_blank">me&#64;privacy.net</a>&gt; wrote in message
&gt; &gt;news:<a href="mailto:4iae63F2va0pU1&#64;individual.net..." target="_blank">4iae63F2va0pU1&#64;individual.net...</a>
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;&gt; It's also not just Pork, any animal could carry Toxoplasmosis if they
eat
&gt; &gt;&gt; grass contaminated by infected cat faeces. Still can't understand how a
&gt; &gt;&gt; whole herd could get infected, unless the feed is infected. But I
thought
&gt; &gt;&gt; there were very strict rules on how any feed is processed these days
after
&gt; &gt;&gt; BSE and Foot and Mouth.
&gt; &gt;&gt; --
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;EU rules are very strict on inclusion and treatment. UK actually has a
&gt; &gt;better record on animal feedstuffs than Germany and the Low Countries
&gt; &gt;At least we don't have the dioxin problems they have had
&gt;
&gt; Yes. It is not so long since grain stored for *on farm* feed manufacture
&gt; could be accessed by cats. How many small farmers were going to destroy
&gt; a batch of feed just because some dried cat turd was found during the
&gt; processing?
&gt;
&gt; Various health scares, salmonella etc. in the run up to BSE have led to
&gt; a fairly stringent set of rules for feed hygiene on farms in the UK.
&gt; Whether this extends to other EU members is beyond my knowledge.
&gt;

the regulations are EU wide, the UK farm assurance specifications are of
course unique to each particular farm assurance scheme


--
--

Jim Webster.

Pat Gardiner, now in the sixth year of raving about bent vets and still no
result

Report this message

#8: Re: Toxoplasmosis - US

Posted on 2006-07-21 10:40:09 by Pat Gardiner

&quot;Jim Webster&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:Jim&#64;websterpagespabank.freeserve.co.uk" target="_blank">Jim&#64;websterpagespabank.freeserve.co.uk</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:4ibdb8F31hn8U1&#64;individual.net..." target="_blank">4ibdb8F31hn8U1&#64;individual.net...</a>
&gt;
&gt; &quot;Tim Lamb&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:tim&#64;marford.demon.co.uk" target="_blank">tim&#64;marford.demon.co.uk</a>&gt; wrote in message
&gt; news:<a href="mailto:PbZjbNCssHwEFwaF&#64;marford.demon.co.uk..." target="_blank">PbZjbNCssHwEFwaF&#64;marford.demon.co.uk...</a>
&gt;&gt; &gt;&gt; --
&gt;&gt; &gt;
&gt;&gt; &gt;EU rules are very strict on inclusion and treatment. UK actually has a
&gt;&gt; &gt;better record on animal feedstuffs than Germany and the Low Countries
&gt;&gt; &gt;At least we don't have the dioxin problems they have had
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Yes. It is not so long since grain stored for *on farm* feed manufacture
&gt;&gt; could be accessed by cats. How many small farmers were going to destroy
&gt;&gt; a batch of feed just because some dried cat turd was found during the
&gt;&gt; processing?
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Various health scares, salmonella etc. in the run up to BSE have led to
&gt;&gt; a fairly stringent set of rules for feed hygiene on farms in the UK.
&gt;&gt; Whether this extends to other EU members is beyond my knowledge.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;
&gt; the regulations are EU wide, the UK farm assurance specifications are of
&gt; course unique to each particular farm assurance scheme

The fact remains that a very senior French government scientist, a
specialist in the condition, made a series of very specific alegations -
that Britain was covering up an animal disease with human health risk.

The reports of his allegations were published and then, within hours,
removed from the Usenet. Fortunatly I managed to download a copy before it
was removed. No comment has been made by either the Food Standards Agency or
the State Veterinary Service

Something is very wrong. It looks like yet another cover-up.

For your convenience, here is the report that was removed. Very matter of
fact, it tackles several of the points made in this thread. The source is of
course the National Pig Association - hardly likely to publish in the first
place if the allegation was untrue.

<a href="http://www.npa-uk.net/" target="_blank">http://www.npa-uk.net/</a>

June 13

Toxoplasmosis endemic in British pigs, claims French expert

By Digby Scott

According to some researchers, outdoor pigs are over 20 times more likely to
be infected with toxoplasma gondii than indoor pigs.

And now a respected French food safety expert, Dr Pascal Boireau, is
claiming toxoplasmosis is endemic in the British national herd, where about
a third of sows are kept outdoors.

This claim could have important implications for the way British pork is
marketed.

As trichinella has not been detected in British pigmeat for 26 years
consumers are gradually being weaned off the idea that pork has to be
overcooked to be safe.

All the evidence suggests that slightly pink pork is perfectly safe, and
certainly more succulent and tender.

But if toxoplasma gondii really is becoming a problem in outdoor pigs - and
the evidence has yet to be produced - pork may once again be seen as a meat
that must be handled with special care.

Outdoor producers might therefore consider intensifying rodent control. They
should also do what they can to discourage cats, which shelter toxoplasma
gondii in their faeces. It will also be helpful if Defra decides to kill-out
the pockets of feral wild boar in Britain.

Pigs can be infected with toxoplasma gondii through ingesting contaminated
feed, water, and soil, and by eating infected rodents.

Toxoplasma gondii infection in food-producing animals is acknowledged as a
potential public health problem by the Food Standards Agency. Infection can
be transmitted to humans through the handling and consumption of raw or
undercooked meat containing the organism.

Although it does not present a hazard to normally healthy adults it can
pose a threat to unborn children and to immunocompromised individuals such
as the ill and elderly.

It has been shown by researchers that pigs kept indoors are far less likely
to be infected with the organism. Conversely, the problem of infection with
outdoor pigs may be greater than was hitherto supposed.

Researchers in Brazil found over 86 percent of outdoor pigs tested had
antibodies to toxoplasma gondii.

There is also evidence that the prevalence of toxoplasma gondii increases
with age.

Dr Pascal Boireau, a director of the French equivalent of the United
Kingdom's
Food Standards Agency, has suggested Britain is underplaying the risk of
contracting toxoplasmosis from British pigmeat.

He claims the toxoplasmosis threat is real and probably growing, and says
more studies are needed, especially into animal-to-animal transmission.

He acknowledges the truth in Britain's claim that the national pig herd is
free of the parasite trichinella but says no such claim can be made for
toxoplasmosis.

He is also concerned about the situation in France where there are greater
opportunities for outdoor pigs to be cross-contaminated from wild boar,
where infection rates are running at 10-20 percent.


Regards
Pat Gardiner
www.go-self-sufficient.com




&gt;
&gt;
&gt; --
&gt; --
&gt;
&gt; Jim Webster.
&gt;
&gt; Pat Gardiner, now in the sixth year of raving about bent vets and still no
&gt; result
&gt;
&gt;

Report this message

#9: Re: Toxoplasmosis - US

Posted on 2006-07-22 00:11:05 by Robert Fuchs

&quot;Pat Gardiner&quot; wrote ((snip))
&gt; June 13
&gt;
&gt; Toxoplasmosis endemic in British pigs, claims French expert
&gt;
&gt; By Digby Scott
&gt;
&gt; According to some researchers, outdoor pigs are over 20 times more likely
&gt; to
&gt; be infected with toxoplasma gondii than indoor pigs.
&gt;
&gt; And now a respected French food safety expert, Dr Pascal Boireau, is
&gt; claiming toxoplasmosis is endemic in the British national herd, where
&gt; about
&gt; a third of sows are kept outdoors.
&gt;
&gt; This claim could have important implications for the way British pork is
&gt; marketed.
&gt;
&gt; As trichinella has not been detected in British pigmeat for 26 years
&gt; consumers are gradually being weaned off the idea that pork has to be
&gt; overcooked to be safe.
&gt;
&gt; All the evidence suggests that slightly pink pork is perfectly safe, and
&gt; certainly more succulent and tender.
&gt;
&gt; But if toxoplasma gondii really is becoming a problem in outdoor pigs -
&gt; and
&gt; the evidence has yet to be produced - pork may once again be seen as a
&gt; meat
&gt; that must be handled with special care.
&gt;
&gt; Outdoor producers might therefore consider intensifying rodent control.
&gt; They
&gt; should also do what they can to discourage cats, which shelter toxoplasma
&gt; gondii in their faeces. It will also be helpful if Defra decides to
&gt; kill-out
&gt; the pockets of feral wild boar in Britain.
&gt;
&gt; Pigs can be infected with toxoplasma gondii through ingesting contaminated
&gt; feed, water, and soil, and by eating infected rodents.
&gt;
&gt; Toxoplasma gondii infection in food-producing animals is acknowledged as a
&gt; potential public health problem by the Food Standards Agency. Infection
&gt; can
&gt; be transmitted to humans through the handling and consumption of raw or
&gt; undercooked meat containing the organism.
&gt;
&gt; Although it does not present a hazard to normally healthy adults it can
&gt; pose a threat to unborn children and to immunocompromised individuals such
&gt; as the ill and elderly.
&gt;
&gt; It has been shown by researchers that pigs kept indoors are far less
&gt; likely
&gt; to be infected with the organism. Conversely, the problem of infection
&gt; with
&gt; outdoor pigs may be greater than was hitherto supposed.
&gt;
&gt; Researchers in Brazil found over 86 percent of outdoor pigs tested had
&gt; antibodies to toxoplasma gondii.
&gt;
&gt; There is also evidence that the prevalence of toxoplasma gondii increases
&gt; with age.
&gt;
&gt; Dr Pascal Boireau, a director of the French equivalent of the United
&gt; Kingdom's
&gt; Food Standards Agency, has suggested Britain is underplaying the risk of
&gt; contracting toxoplasmosis from British pigmeat.
&gt;
&gt; He claims the toxoplasmosis threat is real and probably growing, and says
&gt; more studies are needed, especially into animal-to-animal transmission.
&gt;
&gt; He acknowledges the truth in Britain's claim that the national pig herd is
&gt; free of the parasite trichinella but says no such claim can be made for
&gt; toxoplasmosis.
&gt;
&gt; He is also concerned about the situation in France where there are greater
&gt; opportunities for outdoor pigs to be cross-contaminated from wild boar,
&gt; where infection rates are running at 10-20 percent.
&gt;
I must admit to laughing at a Frenchman complaining about toxoplasmosis
infection in another country considering their populations percentage
infection rate is the highest in the world, and I do wonder if it's all just
another French smoke screen or ploy to help the French farmers.
But if, as he says, our national herd is infected, then we should all be
told, and told how, and it must be stopped and the problem cured.

--
Regards
Bob Hobden

Report this message

#10: Re: Toxoplasmosis - US

Posted on 2006-07-22 00:14:55 by Pat Gardiner

&quot;Bob Hobden&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:me&#64;privacy.net" target="_blank">me&#64;privacy.net</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:4id1npF3853fU1&#64;individual.net..." target="_blank">4id1npF3853fU1&#64;individual.net...</a>
&gt;
&gt; &quot;Pat Gardiner&quot; wrote ((snip))
&gt;&gt; June 13
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Toxoplasmosis endemic in British pigs, claims French expert
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; By Digby Scott
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; According to some researchers, outdoor pigs are over 20 times more likely
&gt;&gt; to
&gt;&gt; be infected with toxoplasma gondii than indoor pigs.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; And now a respected French food safety expert, Dr Pascal Boireau, is
&gt;&gt; claiming toxoplasmosis is endemic in the British national herd, where
&gt;&gt; about
&gt;&gt; a third of sows are kept outdoors.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; This claim could have important implications for the way British pork is
&gt;&gt; marketed.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; As trichinella has not been detected in British pigmeat for 26 years
&gt;&gt; consumers are gradually being weaned off the idea that pork has to be
&gt;&gt; overcooked to be safe.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; All the evidence suggests that slightly pink pork is perfectly safe, and
&gt;&gt; certainly more succulent and tender.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; But if toxoplasma gondii really is becoming a problem in outdoor pigs -
&gt;&gt; and
&gt;&gt; the evidence has yet to be produced - pork may once again be seen as a
&gt;&gt; meat
&gt;&gt; that must be handled with special care.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Outdoor producers might therefore consider intensifying rodent control.
&gt;&gt; They
&gt;&gt; should also do what they can to discourage cats, which shelter toxoplasma
&gt;&gt; gondii in their faeces. It will also be helpful if Defra decides to
&gt;&gt; kill-out
&gt;&gt; the pockets of feral wild boar in Britain.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Pigs can be infected with toxoplasma gondii through ingesting
&gt;&gt; contaminated
&gt;&gt; feed, water, and soil, and by eating infected rodents.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Toxoplasma gondii infection in food-producing animals is acknowledged as
&gt;&gt; a
&gt;&gt; potential public health problem by the Food Standards Agency. Infection
&gt;&gt; can
&gt;&gt; be transmitted to humans through the handling and consumption of raw or
&gt;&gt; undercooked meat containing the organism.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Although it does not present a hazard to normally healthy adults it can
&gt;&gt; pose a threat to unborn children and to immunocompromised individuals
&gt;&gt; such
&gt;&gt; as the ill and elderly.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; It has been shown by researchers that pigs kept indoors are far less
&gt;&gt; likely
&gt;&gt; to be infected with the organism. Conversely, the problem of infection
&gt;&gt; with
&gt;&gt; outdoor pigs may be greater than was hitherto supposed.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Researchers in Brazil found over 86 percent of outdoor pigs tested had
&gt;&gt; antibodies to toxoplasma gondii.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; There is also evidence that the prevalence of toxoplasma gondii increases
&gt;&gt; with age.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Dr Pascal Boireau, a director of the French equivalent of the United
&gt;&gt; Kingdom's
&gt;&gt; Food Standards Agency, has suggested Britain is underplaying the risk of
&gt;&gt; contracting toxoplasmosis from British pigmeat.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; He claims the toxoplasmosis threat is real and probably growing, and says
&gt;&gt; more studies are needed, especially into animal-to-animal transmission.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; He acknowledges the truth in Britain's claim that the national pig herd
&gt;&gt; is
&gt;&gt; free of the parasite trichinella but says no such claim can be made for
&gt;&gt; toxoplasmosis.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; He is also concerned about the situation in France where there are
&gt;&gt; greater
&gt;&gt; opportunities for outdoor pigs to be cross-contaminated from wild boar,
&gt;&gt; where infection rates are running at 10-20 percent.
&gt;&gt;
&gt; I must admit to laughing at a Frenchman complaining about toxoplasmosis
&gt; infection in another country considering their populations percentage
&gt; infection rate is the highest in the world, and I do wonder if it's all
&gt; just another French smoke screen or ploy to help the French farmers.
&gt; But if, as he says, our national herd is infected, then we should all be
&gt; told, and told how, and it must be stopped and the problem cured.

Thanks.

I can't do it all on my own and appreciate all the help I can get.


--
Regards
Pat Gardiner
www.go-self-sufficient.com
&gt;
&gt; --
&gt; Regards
&gt; Bob Hobden
&gt;
&gt;

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