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#1: need plants to control weeds

Posted on 2006-07-20 22:57:07 by David

There's an area of waste land at the end of my garden. It's actually a steep bank and is quite difficult to stand on it without sliding down. It's covered with bramble plants and I've started cutting out the brambles. The ground underneath is clear of weeds due to the bramble canopy. Is there anything I could plant in the ground that would provide good ground cover, keep the weeds down, and not grow too high, up to 20 feet would be alright. I haven't money to buy plants, so I was thinking that maybe there's something in the countryside that I could use like hawthorn, etc. Any ideas?


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#2: Re: need plants to control weeds

Posted on 2006-07-21 00:29:22 by unknown

Post removed (X-No-Archive: yes)

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#3: Re: need plants to control weeds

Posted on 2006-07-21 09:38:45 by Nick Byford

I like the idea of hawthorn. Blackthorn might be even better as it produces
sloes and you can make sloe gin from this. In addition, a hedge - for that
is what you would effectively be creating - is a wonderful haven for birds
and would encourage birds like the tits, finches and thrushes to reside in
your garden.

I feel that the main reason why there are few birds in gardens is the lack
of real hedging like blackthorn and hawthorn.

We have a vast expanse of hedging in our garden and it's usually full of
birds.
If you're interested, we're at www.pennix.co.uk

Hope this steers you in a good direction.

Nick

&quot;David&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:ds1234567890&#64;yahoo.co.uk" target="_blank">ds1234567890&#64;yahoo.co.uk</a>&gt; wrote in message
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&gt; There's an area of waste land at the end of my garden. It's actually a
steep bank and is quite difficult to stand on it without sliding down. It's
covered with bramble plants and I've started cutting out the brambles. The
ground underneath is clear of weeds due to the bramble canopy. Is there
anything I could plant in the ground that would provide good ground cover,
keep the weeds down, and not grow too high, up to 20 feet would be alright.
I haven't money to buy plants, so I was thinking that maybe there's
something in the countryside that I could use like hawthorn, etc. Any
ideas?
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; --------------= Posted using GrabIt =----------------
&gt; ------= Binary Usenet downloading made easy =---------
&gt; -= Get GrabIt for free from <a href="http://www.shemes.com/" target="_blank">http://www.shemes.com/</a> =-
&gt;

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#4: Re: need plants to control weeds

Posted on 2006-07-21 09:51:55 by Charlie Pridham

&quot;David&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:ds1234567890&#64;yahoo.co.uk" target="_blank">ds1234567890&#64;yahoo.co.uk</a>&gt; wrote in message
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&gt; There's an area of waste land at the end of my garden. It's actually a
steep bank and is quite difficult to stand on it without sliding down. It's
covered with bramble plants and I've started cutting out the brambles. The
ground underneath is clear of weeds due to the bramble canopy. Is there
anything I could plant in the ground that would provide good ground cover,
keep the weeds down, and not grow too high, up to 20 feet would be alright.
I haven't money to buy plants, so I was thinking that maybe there's
something in the countryside that I could use like hawthorn, etc. Any
ideas?
&gt;
Foxgloves, just start throwing the seed down now, but if you have only cut
down the brambles then you will have the brambles back by next year.
--
Charlie, gardening in Cornwall.
<a href="http://www.roselandhouse.co.uk" target="_blank">http://www.roselandhouse.co.uk</a>
Holders of National Plant Collection of Clematis viticella (cvs)

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#5: Re: need plants to control weeds

Posted on 2006-07-21 11:20:57 by K

&gt;
&gt;&quot;David&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:ds1234567890&#64;yahoo.co.uk" target="_blank">ds1234567890&#64;yahoo.co.uk</a>&gt; wrote in message
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&gt; I was thinking that maybe there's
&gt;something in the countryside that I could use like hawthorn, etc. Any
&gt;ideas?

What did you mean by this? Using native plants on the grounds that they
will be well suited to the conditions and will grow well, collecting
seed from the countryside, or digging up plants?
--
Kay

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#6: Re: need plants to control weeds

Posted on 2006-07-21 15:16:56 by mike_lyle_uk

K wrote:
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;&quot;David&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:ds1234567890&#64;yahoo.co.uk" target="_blank">ds1234567890&#64;yahoo.co.uk</a>&gt; wrote in message
&gt; &gt;news:D6Svg.45569$<a href="mailto:ST2.38767&#64;newsfe5-win.ntli.net..." target="_blank">ST2.38767&#64;newsfe5-win.ntli.net...</a>
&gt;
&gt; &gt; I was thinking that maybe there's
&gt; &gt;something in the countryside that I could use like hawthorn, etc. Any
&gt; &gt;ideas?
&gt;
&gt; What did you mean by this? Using native plants on the grounds that they
&gt; will be well suited to the conditions and will grow well, collecting
&gt; seed from the countryside, or digging up plants?

Yes, a bit alarming. You're not allowed to collect seed even of common
plants without the owner's permission, and digging up from the woods
and verges is a no-no. Few if any will actually mind if you do collect
some seed from the wayside, but it needs to be done sensibly.

The problem with seed is time. Once you've cut down the brambles and
dug out their central crown (easier than it may sound: they're very
shallow), all the weed seeds will get going faster than your hawthorn,
holly, etc seeds. The principal weed seed lurking in this spot will be
from the brambles themselves -- depressing!

I love these problems, but there isn't an immediate solution without
spending money. Perhaps just live with it and gradually prepare the
site for a twelvemonth while seeds and cuttings come on. Gardeners will
always respond kindly to courteous requests.

Prostrate cotoneasters come on well from seed, and you'll often find
extension growth which has rooted itself naturally; and vincas romp
away from not so much cuttings as rippings, while ivies are easy, too.
I mention these because they're fast and evergreen and look nice
enough, not because they're exciting. (Evergreen is good if you need to
suppress intruders.) Variegated vinca minor or ivies will add a little
lightness and colour contrast when the cotoneasters aren't covered with
berries or their little flowers. Things like these will give you cover
quite quickly and the roots will prevent the erosion you must guard
against on a steep bank. Ivy will out-compete the others, though, and
often loses its variegation.

Meanwhile, if you want height, you can be bringing on some other
cuttings, or gradually buying in a few cheap offers. A baby tree or
shrub can cost less than a coffee in town, after all; and postponing a
new shirt can fill a basket! Jumble sales and WI markets: if there's a
regular WI market, explain the problem, and you may have to stand back.

Oh, nearly forgot: roses. Some scrambly roses will be just as vigorous
on that site as their relatives, the brambles. Dead easy from cuttings,
but won't be ready to move for a year. Fabulous in summer, but won't
look much good in winter -- but then neither do the brambles. I also
rather doubt if they'd be brilliant at weed-suppression, and weeding
among them would be painful. There are experts on the varieties here.

--
Mike.

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#7: Re: need plants to control weeds

Posted on 2006-07-23 04:53:44 by computar2006

Thanks to all who took the time to reply. I wasn't thinking of digging
anything up in the countryside. Before planting anything, I think I'll
need to wait until the ground is soft and wet so that I can dig out the
bramble roots. I will certainly look at all the options mentioned in
this thread. I might try to bring on some butterfly bush cuttings in
my flower bed for planitng out next year. I also had the idea of
gathering ash seeds and scattering them on the area. The other problem
I have is the appearance of japanese knotweed. I've been keeping it
down for the last 4 years with pulling and cutting.

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#8: Re: need plants to control weeds

Posted on 2006-07-23 10:13:35 by K

computar2006 &lt;<a href="mailto:google.temp&#64;ntlworld.com" target="_blank">google.temp&#64;ntlworld.com</a>&gt; writes
&gt;Thanks to all who took the time to reply. I wasn't thinking of digging
&gt;anything up in the countryside. Before planting anything, I think I'll
&gt;need to wait until the ground is soft and wet so that I can dig out the
&gt;bramble roots.

You don't need to get the whole root up IME. If you root around with
your fingers, you'll find just below the surface there's a sort of node
or growing point from which all the roots and all the shoots branch off
- if you can get this up, you won't get any regrowth. Get rid of 90% in
the first year, then keep on top of any that reappear, and within 5
years you'll have cleared the lot.

&gt; I will certainly look at all the options mentioned in
&gt;this thread. I might try to bring on some butterfly bush cuttings in
&gt;my flower bed for planitng out next year. I also had the idea of
&gt;gathering ash seeds and scattering them on the area.

I wouldn't if it were my area. Ash grows quickly and eventually makes a
very large tree. It's also very good at lurking inside other plants, so
the first time you spot it is as a shoot appearing out of the top of a
bush - by that time it has so much vigour that repeatedly cutting it
back takes a long time to get rid of it, and you can't dig it out
without digging out the otehr bush.

&gt; The other problem
&gt;I have is the appearance of japanese knotweed. I've been keeping it
&gt;down for the last 4 years with pulling and cutting.

Get rid of that completely before you do any permanent planting else you
will lose the battle.
&gt;

--
Kay

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#9: Re: need plants to control weeds

Posted on 2006-07-23 21:29:48 by computar2006

K wrote:
&gt; computar2006 &lt;<a href="mailto:google.temp&#64;ntlworld.com" target="_blank">google.temp&#64;ntlworld.com</a>&gt; writes
&gt; &gt;Thanks to all who took the time to reply. I wasn't thinking of digging
&gt; &gt;anything up in the countryside. Before planting anything, I think I'll
&gt; &gt;need to wait until the ground is soft and wet so that I can dig out the
&gt; &gt;bramble roots.
&gt;
&gt; You don't need to get the whole root up IME. If you root around with
&gt; your fingers, you'll find just below the surface there's a sort of node
&gt; or growing point from which all the roots and all the shoots branch off
&gt; - if you can get this up, you won't get any regrowth. Get rid of 90% in
&gt; the first year, then keep on top of any that reappear, and within 5
&gt; years you'll have cleared the lot.
&gt;
&gt; &gt; I will certainly look at all the options mentioned in
&gt; &gt;this thread. I might try to bring on some butterfly bush cuttings in
&gt; &gt;my flower bed for planitng out next year. I also had the idea of
&gt; &gt;gathering ash seeds and scattering them on the area.
&gt;
&gt; I wouldn't if it were my area. Ash grows quickly and eventually makes a
&gt; very large tree. It's also very good at lurking inside other plants, so
&gt; the first time you spot it is as a shoot appearing out of the top of a
&gt; bush - by that time it has so much vigour that repeatedly cutting it
&gt; back takes a long time to get rid of it, and you can't dig it out
&gt; without digging out the otehr bush.
&gt;
&gt; &gt; The other problem
&gt; &gt;I have is the appearance of japanese knotweed. I've been keeping it
&gt; &gt;down for the last 4 years with pulling and cutting.
&gt;
&gt; Get rid of that completely before you do any permanent planting else you
&gt; will lose the battle.
&gt; &gt;
&gt;
&gt; --
&gt; Kay

Thanks for the bramble tip. I tried that on one just now and it was so
easy. This will save me a ton of work.

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