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#1: Expert tree help please

Posted on 2006-07-22 16:20:57 by Broadback

5 years ago I planted a number different types of maiden saplings, all
of which have thrived. Until recently that is. I returned home from a
few days away to find that the Silver Birch which was about 3 to 4
metres tall with a trunk of around (pun there) 15 to 20 cm circumference
had keeled over. In doing so it had snapped the tree support and broken
the substantial rubber tie. The leaves were still looking very healthy.
I was particularly saddened as the trunk's bark was just nicely
showing the characteristic silver flaking. I tried to support it back
up, but in vain. Now my question is has anyone any ideas as to what the
problem may have been? I do not THINK that it is lack of water as it
was only a couple of feet above a pond, which, though dried out, is
still extremely wet. I hope the other varieties will not be going the
same way. There could, of course, have been very strong winds (it had
fallen towards the West)but the problem was the trunk was bent (damaged
but not snapped) about 30 cm above ground level.

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#2: Re: Expert tree help please

Posted on 2006-07-22 21:12:04 by uce

In message &lt;<a href="mailto:4ieqicF3gsm2U1&#64;individual.net" target="_blank">4ieqicF3gsm2U1&#64;individual.net</a>&gt;, Broadback
&lt;<a href="mailto:wen&#64;towill.plus.com" target="_blank">wen&#64;towill.plus.com</a>&gt; writes

&gt;from a few days away to find that the Silver Birch which was about 3 to
&gt;4 metres tall with a trunk of around (pun there) 15 to 20 cm
&gt;circumference had keeled over. In doing so it had snapped the tree
&gt;support and broken the substantial rubber tie. The leaves were still
&gt;looking very healthy. I was particularly saddened as the trunk's bark
&gt;was just nicely showing the characteristic silver flaking. I tried to
&gt;support it back up, but in vain. Now my question is has anyone any
&gt;ideas as to what the problem may have been? I do not THINK that it is
&gt;lack of water as it was only a couple of feet above a pond, which,
&gt;though dried out, is still extremely wet. I hope the other varieties
&gt;will not be going the same way. There could, of course, have been very
&gt;strong winds (it had fallen towards the West)but the problem was the
&gt;trunk was bent (damaged but not snapped) about 30 cm above ground level.

Wind damage, unless it was placed where large animals or humans could
attack it. Has your area had thunderstorms while you were away? The
wind associated with a storm cell can do quite a bit of damage on a day
that's not otherwise windy.

If your measurements are correct your tree was rather thin in the trunk
for its height. This could be caused by being too close to other trees,
or by being tied to a support: tree stems that flex in the wind respond
by thickening, if you support them they rely on the support - and your
tree was let down suddenly when the support snapped.

If your other trees are also still staked after five years, consider
removing the stakes - do it in autumn after the leaves are off.

If your birch wasn't uprooted it'll regrow faster than a new one would
grow. If it's dead, don't replant the same species in the same place as
the soil will be tired of it.

--
Sue ]:(:)

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#3: Re: Expert tree help please

Posted on 2006-07-23 14:23:49 by Broadback

MadCow wrote:
&gt; In message &lt;<a href="mailto:4ieqicF3gsm2U1&#64;individual.net" target="_blank">4ieqicF3gsm2U1&#64;individual.net</a>&gt;, Broadback
&gt; &lt;<a href="mailto:wen&#64;towill.plus.com" target="_blank">wen&#64;towill.plus.com</a>&gt; writes
&gt;
&gt;&gt; from a few days away to find that the Silver Birch which was about 3
&gt;&gt; to 4 metres tall with a trunk of around (pun there) 15 to 20 cm
&gt;&gt; circumference had keeled over. In doing so it had snapped the tree
&gt;&gt; support and broken the substantial rubber tie. The leaves were still
&gt;&gt; looking very healthy. I was particularly saddened as the trunk's bark
&gt;&gt; was just nicely showing the characteristic silver flaking. I tried to
&gt;&gt; support it back up, but in vain. Now my question is has anyone any
&gt;&gt; ideas as to what the problem may have been? I do not THINK that it is
&gt;&gt; lack of water as it was only a couple of feet above a pond, which,
&gt;&gt; though dried out, is still extremely wet. I hope the other varieties
&gt;&gt; will not be going the same way. There could, of course, have been
&gt;&gt; very strong winds (it had fallen towards the West)but the problem was
&gt;&gt; the trunk was bent (damaged but not snapped) about 30 cm above ground
&gt;&gt; level.
&gt;
&gt; Wind damage, unless it was placed where large animals or humans could
&gt; attack it. Has your area had thunderstorms while you were away? The
&gt; wind associated with a storm cell can do quite a bit of damage on a day
&gt; that's not otherwise windy.
&gt;
&gt; If your measurements are correct your tree was rather thin in the trunk
&gt; for its height. This could be caused by being too close to other trees,
&gt; or by being tied to a support: tree stems that flex in the wind respond
&gt; by thickening, if you support them they rely on the support - and your
&gt; tree was let down suddenly when the support snapped.
&gt;
&gt; If your other trees are also still staked after five years, consider
&gt; removing the stakes - do it in autumn after the leaves are off.
&gt;
&gt; If your birch wasn't uprooted it'll regrow faster than a new one would
&gt; grow. If it's dead, don't replant the same species in the same place as
&gt; the soil will be tired of it.
&gt;
Thanks, of course it could have been that a mad cow broke in and
trampled it! :-) I'll take your advice as regards stakes in the Autumn,
also I will try cutting off at the damaged point and see if it regrows,
but I doubt it.

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#4: Re: Expert tree help please

Posted on 2006-07-23 14:55:35 by K

Broadback &lt;<a href="mailto:wen&#64;towill.plus.com" target="_blank">wen&#64;towill.plus.com</a>&gt; writes
&gt;&gt;
&gt;Thanks, of course it could have been that a mad cow broke in and
&gt;trampled it! :-) I'll take your advice as regards stakes in the Autumn,
&gt;also I will try cutting off at the damaged point and see if it regrows,
&gt;but I doubt it.

Don't be too pessimistic. I've seen advice on growing clumps of silver
birch by growing one, then cutting it back almost to base, whereupon two
or three new trunks will happen - don't follow these instructions which
are almost completely forgotten, but it demonstrates quite a keenness to
regrow.
--
Kay

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